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James Williams was adamant that he wanted to vote in this year's presidential election. But the 77-year-old resident of Birmingham, Michigan knew that his days here on Earth were limited.

Williams, whose health was rapidly declining due to colon cancer, carefully watched the calendar. He and his family worried that he would not live long enough to cast his ballot. But he was determined and resolute. As Williams' health continued to decline, they set their sights on September 24, the first day for early voting here in Michigan. However, the family then began to grow concerned that even that day could be elusive.

But eventually, September 24 arrived and Williams' son and daughter-in-law drove him to the county clerk's office so he could obtain his ballot. He sat in the car as he cast his final vote but then insisted on dropping the ballot in the box himself. With his son and daughter-in-law steadying him on each side, Williams walked from the car to the clerk's office to make it official.

Willilams smiled for the camera as the ballot successfully made its way into the ballot box.

“I think the state of things is cause of concern for all of us. That’s why I wanted to be sure to get here and vote,” he told a photojournalist who happened upon the scene.

His son David looked back on the day, recounting it for the Washington Post.

“He could get out of bed on his own and walk on his own, but it was very difficult,” David Williams said. But “when the day came, he said, ‘I can get out of bed, I can get in the car, and we can go up there.’”

James Williams passed away eight days later.

Unfortunately, Williams' family learned that his father's vote won't count. Under Michigan law, his ballot has to be deemed invalid because he is deceased.

“Here’s the thing: It pisses me off that it doesn’t count. But it really doesn’t diminish what it meant to him or to us,” said David.

See the full report, including pictures here.