Michigan experienced an extremely dry spring and early summer compared to previous years. However, over the past few weeks, we've had our fair share of thunderstorms which has helped out a lot.

With the lack of rain we experienced early on this season, I think you'll see some people harvesting rainwater whenever they get a chance. Wait, what? Yes, harvesting rainwater is a real thing.

What is Rainwater Harvesting?

Rainwater harvesting is the collecting of rainwater for different uses. It involves capturing rainwater and storing it in containers like tanks or barrels.

According to Today's Homeowner, many homeowners use rainwater as a water source for irrigating their gardens, potted plants, or potentially entire yards. Some homeowners even filter, boil, and drink it, although some studies advise against it. It's a way to save water and manage rainwater effectively.

Believe it or not, harvesting rainwater in some states is frowned upon.

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In some other states, they don't allow the storing and saving of rainwater for potential future use due to concerns about bacteria, possible pollutants, and even the storage methods employed. In some cases, you might even need a permit to harvest rainwater.

Is Rainwater Harvesting in Michigan Legal?

Yes, rainwater harvesting is legal in Michigan as there aren't any statewide rules specifically about rainwater harvesting. However, different cities or areas within Michigan might have their own rules when it comes to rainwater harvesting.

While rainwater harvesting can help lower your water bill a bit, it may seem like a big hassle just to save a few bucks.

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