Aerial treatment to combat Eastern equine encephalitis that was slated to begin Sunday in Michigan has been delayed due to poor weather conditions.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services had planned to begin spraying for the mosquitos Sunday night (9/29) in Berrien, Cass, St. Joseph, and Van Buren counties. MDHS is expected to release a revised aerial treatment schedule today.

As of now, there are no plans for aerial treatment for Genesee or Lapeer counties.

EEE is said to present an emergent threat to Michigan public health. Three people have died after contracting the disease and nine cases have been confirmed in humans in Barry, Berrien, Calhoun, Cass, Kalamazoo, and Van Buren counties.

Cases of Eastern equine encephalitis have been found in 30 animals in 15 Michigan counties, including Genesee County. Others include Allegan, Barry, Berrien, Calhoun, Cass, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Kent, Lapeer, Livingston, Montcalm, Newaygo, St. Joseph, and Van Buren counties.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has advised people in Genesee, Lapeer, Kalamazoo, Van Buren, Berrien, Barry, St. Joseph, and Cass counties to cancel outdoor activities that occur after dusk because of the potentially dangerous threat.