Magnet fishing is an actual thing. There are groups of people dedicated to the sport, online message boards, and countless YouTube videos that document all the treasures that get retrieved from various bodies of water.

The Name Says it All

Magnet fishing is just what you'd imagine. A heavy-duty magnet is attached to a rope, in order to retrieve metal objects that have been dropped or lost in the water.

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Motor City Magnet Fishers is a father-daughter team based in Detroit that travels the state pulling treasures from the water. The pair traveled to Flint to assist some local magnet fishermen (or fishers as they're called) as they attempted to pull 'something' from the Flint River.

They have their own YouTube channel which you can check out here.

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As you watch the video of the extrication below, you can't help but wonder how in God's name was it ever decided to switch Flint's water source to the Flint River? That, of course, is a topic for another conversation even if it's not yet water under the bridge.

What Was Retrieved from the Flint River?

As you can probably imagine, the crew's haul included a lot of junk. But it was interesting to see some of the finds, including:

  • An electric knife
  • Several fishing poles
  • An old cable box

And the crew's big find happens at about the 3:30 mark in the video -- They pulled a safe out of the Flint River.

Sadly,  there wasn't a stash of gold bars or cash in the safe, but Motor City Magnet Fishers promises that there's more to come in part II of their Flint fishing expedition which is due to be posted next week.

Stay tuned.

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This breathtaking home in Davison belonged to former Flint Mayor Don Williamson and his wife Patsy Lou Williamson who owned several car dealerships in the area. Their custom-designed home was built in 2010 and sits on 19 acres on the Potter Lake Peninsula. The main home is about 3,800 square feet and there's a stunning guest house on the property as well.

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