Earlier this week, we told you about a mysterious fireball that was spotted in the sky over Michigan.

Reports came in from all over the state with people thinking it was a meteor, satellite or maybe even aliens. I think we all knew it wasn't aliens but whether it was a meteor or satellite was the real question.

When I first wrote about the fireball in the sky, I mentioned that when I was a kid I witnessed a satellite that had crashed into Saginaw Bay and it looked really similar to this strange object. Even the American Meteorological Society said that it wasn't a natural fireball and appeared to be the re-entry of an unknown satellite or spent rocket body.

Well, come to find out it was in fact a satellite that was crashing to earth. More specifically it was a failed Russian spy satellite that crashed back to Earth Wednesday morning.

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According to Space, Kosmos-2551 was a Russian reconnaissance satellite that launched on Sept. 9 but apparently failed shortly thereafter. The spacecraft had not adjusted its orbit once since liftoff. It was predicted on October 18 that it would re-enter the earth's atmosphere, which of course it did.

I wish that I would have personally witnessed the satellite crashing to earth but I was fast asleep at 12:43 am. Thankfully there were a bunch of Michiganders that not only witnessed it but also caught a video of it.

The video below really shows you just how long it took for that satellite to burn up.

We no longer have to wonder or make assumptions as to what that was in the skies over Michigan.

50 Haunted Michigan Locations

Below is just the tip of the iceberg—a list of fifty Michigan hauntings that have been "reported" in cemeteries, houses, woods, jails, businesses, neighborhoods...if you can name it, there's probably a haunting for it.

Take a look at the list of fifty Michigan hauntings below and come to your own conclusions.

LOOK: 50 famous memes and what they mean

With the infinite number of memes scattered across the internet, it's hard to keep track. Just when you've grasped the meaning of one hilarious meme, it has already become old news and replaced by something equally as enigmatic. Online forums like Tumblr, Twitter, 4chan, and Reddit are responsible for a majority of meme infections, and with the constant posting and sharing, finding the source of an original meme is easier said than done. Stacker hunted through internet resources, pop culture publications, and databases like Know Your Meme to find 50 different memes and what they mean. While the almost self-replicating nature of these vague symbols can get exhausting, memes in their essence can also bring people closer together—as long as they have internet access.